NH Dumpster Cat

NH hunting critics’ house of cards - quickly becoming “uninhabitable”.

When a density-dependent disease was believed to be threatening our fox and fisher populations, these same camps blamed the state’s trappers. When hunters were assisting the state with moose biology through harvest data, these camps were working to stop the state’s moose hunt. When volunteer trappers were assisting with bobcat population dynamics, these people were busy claiming the NH Fish & Game Department was “working only for hunters”. We now find ourselves all here again under the bright yellow circus tent of a coyote hunting bill, with the same jokers claiming the “moral majority” once again.

Predator "preservationists" pounce on Fisher population trends

Predator "preservationists" pounce on Fisher population trends

Is New Hampshire finding its way out of a cyclical “boom and bust” fisher trend? Current data is great for checking trends, but does it give you the root cause of a perceived decline? Biologists have stated fisher appear to be adapting (and thriving) in more urban areas; have these creatures forgone the dense hemlock groves where trappers roam for the dumpsters and back decks of suburban sprawl?

Outfoxed

Outfoxed

Disease, debate, and discourse abound amid New Hampshire’s controversial fox hunting/trapping restriction proposals. The NH Fish & Game Department now finds itself in an awkward squaredance with Sportsmen, Activists, and Politicians.

Rise of the Dumpster Cats

Rise of the Dumpster Cats

Hoarding and stockpiling our wildlife never works. One way or another, New Hampshire’s public, politicians, and the NH Fish & Game Department are going to have face the reality that nobody should be proud of New Hampshire’s Dumpster Cat.