Trapping

Last year’s rodent “bumper crop” means predator boom this spring

Just as the acorn mast abundance of two years ago drove a rodent explosion last year, I’m confident the expansion in rodent presence will drive a “cyclical boom” in New England’s predatory species this year.

Fur Institute updates "Certified Trap List" for 2019

The Fur Institute of Canada announced updates to their list of certified traps this week. The list of approved traps was updated by the Trap Research and Development Committee (TRDC). To meet the needed requirements for AIHTS trap certification, trap manufacturers must test any trapping device they intend to market for use in Canada. This includes mechanically powered, trigger activated lethal devices, as well as live capture foot-hold and cage traps.

10 Ways To Protect The Future of Hunting & Trapping

10 Ways To Protect The Future of Hunting & Trapping

Here at Furbearer Conservation headquarters, we tend to discuss the politics, legislation, scientific study and other aspects that surround these outdoor pursuits. While this is all good and well, I must admit we haven’t done our due diligence explaining how YOU can help. So here goes our Top Ten Ways you can protect (and promote) the future of hunting and trapping.

Predator "preservationists" pounce on Fisher population trends

Predator "preservationists" pounce on Fisher population trends

Is New Hampshire finding its way out of a cyclical “boom and bust” fisher trend? Current data is great for checking trends, but does it give you the root cause of a perceived decline? Biologists have stated fisher appear to be adapting (and thriving) in more urban areas; have these creatures forgone the dense hemlock groves where trappers roam for the dumpsters and back decks of suburban sprawl?

New Hampshire Trappers: Turn in your tissue!

New Hampshire Trappers: Turn in your tissue!

New Hampshire’s trappers are once again being called upon to assist with wildlife conservation in the region. The state’s trapping community intends to fully answer the call. Multiple conservation-oriented projects are being administered by different agencies, and they’re all requesting tissue and carcass samples from legally trapped furbearing wildlife for scientific testing and research.