research

Fur Institute updates "Certified Trap List" for 2019

The Fur Institute of Canada announced updates to their list of certified traps this week. The list of approved traps was updated by the Trap Research and Development Committee (TRDC). To meet the needed requirements for AIHTS trap certification, trap manufacturers must test any trapping device they intend to market for use in Canada. This includes mechanically powered, trigger activated lethal devices, as well as live capture foot-hold and cage traps.

Northeast Coyote Management: NH H.B. 442 Revisited

While most folks are discussing the rise in problems with coyotes, lawmakers in one Northeast state are calling for more protections. House Bill 442 is currently floating around in New Hampshire’s state house. The bill mandates a closing to coyote hunting from April 1st through August 31st.

Leucisitic Fisher: Diamonds in the Rough

A newly released study in the American Midland Naturalist focuses on the recent discovery of leucism traits found in a traveling male fisher, captured on a trail camera image from Price County, Wisconsin in 2017. The report states its the first scientifically documented case of leucism in pekania pennanti. Although, as we found out, its clearly not the first documented case on the World Wide Web!

When it comes to Conservation, we've got "Issues".

When it comes to Conservation, we've got "Issues".

Introducing our new “Issues” page! The inevitable truth is that some people are hellbent on yanking the licensed hunter and regulated trapper out of the conservation equation. I’ve made it my mission, call it my “civic duty”, along with my constituents and contributors, to “hold the line” and ensure that hands-on management continues - provided it adds wealth to conservation efforts.

New Hampshire Trappers: Turn in your tissue!

New Hampshire Trappers: Turn in your tissue!

New Hampshire’s trappers are once again being called upon to assist with wildlife conservation in the region. The state’s trapping community intends to fully answer the call. Multiple conservation-oriented projects are being administered by different agencies, and they’re all requesting tissue and carcass samples from legally trapped furbearing wildlife for scientific testing and research.