huntervationist

Governor’s turkey hunt highlights New Hampshire’s rural culture

Word on the street says that hunting is on a national downward trend. That “word” clearly hasn’t reached the hillside haunts of New Hampshire, as thousands of Granite State hunters and trappers still take to the woods each spring and fall to take part in the outdoor pastimes that have been integral to rural New England life.

Last year’s rodent “bumper crop” means predator boom this spring

Just as the acorn mast abundance of two years ago drove a rodent explosion last year, I’m confident the expansion in rodent presence will drive a “cyclical boom” in New England’s predatory species this year.

NH hunting critics’ house of cards - quickly becoming “uninhabitable”.

When a density-dependent disease was believed to be threatening our fox and fisher populations, these same camps blamed the state’s trappers. When hunters were assisting the state with moose biology through harvest data, these camps were working to stop the state’s moose hunt. When volunteer trappers were assisting with bobcat population dynamics, these people were busy claiming the NH Fish & Game Department was “working only for hunters”. We now find ourselves all here again under the bright yellow circus tent of a coyote hunting bill, with the same jokers claiming the “moral majority” once again.

A future up for grabs: Have you taken the Hunting Pledge?

A future up for grabs: Have you taken the Hunting Pledge?

The reality is that decisions on the direction of regulated hunting activities are being increasingly dominated by those with a hands-off approach to conservation. Luckily, we have national organizations like the Sportsmen’s Alliance here to help.